by Nicola Chalmers

I had to forget my idea of nature and learn again that stone is hard and in so doing found that it is also soft. I tore leaves, broke stones, cut feathers… in order to go beyond appearances and touch on something of the essence… A stone is one and many stones at the same time…

Andy Goldsworthy

As is a human.

outside, an action (is) outside (of) an action is coating is layering is hiding the what’s that that’s visible? acrobatic posturing O hesitating (between) Oscillating (about) a position a device an equilibrium for fitting over a something that’s O to protect to conceal to weigh and balance in the turning of cards upward facing

The one is in the other.

Andy Goldsworthy

Andy Goldsworthy

Still from PERSONA, Ingmar Bergman

Still from PERSONA, Ingmar Bergman

I love the pairing of these images.

The angel and the girl are met by Nicola Chalmers

Musing on angels and "the sadness of seeing oneself seeing" (Dora Inhof on Michaël Borremans' The Giant). Edwin Muir's poem The Annunciation - come "From far beyond the farthest star, Feathered through time" - will be the starting point for a scene I have in mind.   

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Michaël Borremans, The Giant, 2007

Michaël Borremans, The Giant, 2007

Radical watermelon by Nicola Chalmers

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Winifred Knights, how is it that you have imbued even the Steinian pink-cut-pink segments of watermelon with suspense? The Marriage at Cana, 1923. A strange, unsettling and quietly dramatic scene - and a lesson in anthropomorphism. There’s something a bit rude and modern and maybe radical about the presence (colour?) of watermelon in this painting; the segments look almost as if they are poised to perform an act of subterfuge. I wish I’d written it.

Autumn Sonata by Nicola Chalmers

The trees have got me thinking about Ingmar Bergman's AUTUMN SONATA. And Chopin. Reading her reading the other. How much we expect of the ones we love.